follow your heart little child of the west wind

:: A grave for Mark, a grave for Gwythur, a grave for Gwgawn of the red sword, but, perish the thought, a grave for Arthur ::

Alex. I'm supposed to have married Ewan McGregor, but the universe mixed up time a bit.

Interests: Films and filmmaking. British history. Lord of the Rings. Middle Earth. British tv drama. Costume drama. Films and films.

Currently: Watching more and more Bollywood while pretending everything else is going okay

:: Har pal yahan jee bhar jiyo, jo hai sama, kal ho naa ho ::

Films I’ve experienced in 2013: Page Eight (2011) dir. David Hare,  star. Bill Nighy, Rachel Weisz
Bill Nighy plays an aged MI-5 officer caught in a political mess after his long-time friend and boss, played by Michael Gambon, dies suddenly and leaves behind information that could seriously upset not only the UK, but the world. Throw in a rather brilliant cast of well-known Brits, and you’ve got…….not that much, actually. It was all rather underwhelming, and the hour and thirty five minutes felt like an eternity I almost fell asleep through. I didn’t understand the purpose of Nighy and Weisz’s characters’ relationship, nor was I remotely compelled by it, and the apparent ‘threat’/plot was incredibly vague, hard to follow, and even harder to care about. It tried too hard and fell far too short.

Films I’ve experienced in 2013: Page Eight (2011) dir. David Hare,  star. Bill Nighy, Rachel Weisz

Bill Nighy plays an aged MI-5 officer caught in a political mess after his long-time friend and boss, played by Michael Gambon, dies suddenly and leaves behind information that could seriously upset not only the UK, but the world. Throw in a rather brilliant cast of well-known Brits, and you’ve got…….not that much, actually. It was all rather underwhelming, and the hour and thirty five minutes felt like an eternity I almost fell asleep through. I didn’t understand the purpose of Nighy and Weisz’s characters’ relationship, nor was I remotely compelled by it, and the apparent ‘threat’/plot was incredibly vague, hard to follow, and even harder to care about. It tried too hard and fell far too short.